Little India on a Sunday, a Photoessay

Every Sunday, Singapore’s Little India district comes alive as south Indian foreign workers take their weekly leave and meet up with friends after a physically backbreaking week  It is an important time for bonding and socialising, and mentally fortifying each other through these activities, for these mainly males who have crossed the Indian Ocean and left their families back in the Indian subcontinent to make money in a foreign land.

Here is a photoessay of the scene in Little India on a typical Sunday.

Little India on a Sunday 1All around the Little India district are patches of grass with make shift wash rooms around. Workers from different states and dialect groups have different places where they meet up.

Little India on a Sunday 2A hawker hawks his wares to the foreign workers.

Little India on a Sunday 3A compere entices people to enter the cell phone store with a string of discounts and sale offers.

Little India on a Sunday 4A short distance from the compere, another shop is hosting a special smart phone deal at SGD 59 dollars, the popular plan brings in a bevy of customers.

Little India on a Sunday 5A mainstay along Little India is Azmi Keema Chapati, prepared by a group of South Indian Muslims. The uncle doesn’t much like photos to be taken, and waves us away after this photo is taken.

Little India on a Sunday 6The newly refurbished Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple at Serangoon Road rings its bells to call out to devotees to attend the temple for prayers.

Little India on a Sunday 7For those interested in reading up on news at home, Sunday presents an opportunity to read news at home. Most of the foreign workers come from Tamil speaking regions such as Tamil Nadu in India.

Little India on a Sunday 8Gold is a particularly important cultural item in South Asian culture, which explains the presence of the Soon Huat Gold trading company at the heart of Little India.

Little India on a Sunday 9A staff member takes sweetmeats to sell to customers at Komalas Vilas, a dining establishment within Little India.

Little India on a Sunday 10Shoppers at Dunlop Street

Little India on a Sunday 11Roadside stall in Campbell Lane, selling flowers for Hindu Devotees, making their way to the Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple.

Little India on a Sunday 12A vegetable store seller at Campbell Lane prepares to sell vegetables to buyers who will come in as the sun sets.

Little India on a Sunday 13Saris and other traditional Indian dresses sold at the Tekka Market.

Little India on a Sunday 14Viewed from above, the first floor of Tekka Complex is a wet market. A chinese store owner opens his store late to sell fish to foreign workers who combine their expenditures with their colleagues to buy fish for a few good meals over the next few days.

Little India on a Sunday 15Tekka is one market of the few markets in Singapore where mutton is sold. A crowd waits around a store as mutton is prepared for customers to bring back.

Little India on a Sunday 16A stone’s throw away from the mutton and fish store is a beef store. The owner is standing around and looking. Beef does not sell in Little India on a Sunday as most of the buyers then are Hindus. Cows are considered sacred in Hindu tradition. The store keeper has not put any beef on his shop front and is probably watching the crowd.

Little India on a Sunday 17A tailor works behind the scenes to mend clothes for customers.

Little India on a Sunday 18The food centre at Tekka Market open with food stores selling a huge variety of South Indian food. Street food of Indian origin in Singapore tends to be South Indian in origin, while restaurant food tends to be North Indian in origin.

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. shantiepc says:

    Reblogged this on The EndPoint Business Blog and commented:
    Captures the essence of a weekend at Singapore’s Little India.

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